Wednesday, September 5, 2018

#Gluten #Relief Plus for #Celiac #Disease

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Celiac disease symptoms in children & adults
  • weight loss.
  • vomiting.
  • abdominal bloating.
  • abdominal pain.
  • persistent diarrhea or constipation.
  • pale, fatty, foul-smelling stools.

An immune reaction to eating gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye.

Common
More than 200,000 US cases per year
Treatment can help, but this condition can't be cured
Requires a medical diagnosis
Lab tests or imaging often required
Chronic: can last for years or be lifelong


Over time, the immune reaction to eating gluten creates inflammation that damages the small intestine's lining, leading to medical complications. It also prevents absorption of some nutrients (malabsorption).
The classic symptom is diarrhea. Other symptoms include bloating, gas, fatigue, low blood count (anemia), and osteoporosis. Many people have no symptoms.The mainstay of treatment is a strict gluten-free diet that can help manage symptoms and promote intestinal healing.


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What is Gluten?

Gluten is a general name for the proteins found in wheat (wheatberries, durum, emmer, semolina, spelt, farina, farro, graham, KAMUT® khorasan wheat and einkorn), rye, barley and triticale – a cross between wheat and rye. Gluten helps foods maintain their shape, acting as a glue that holds food together. Gluten can be found in many types of foods, even ones that would not be expected.

The Big 3: Wheat, Barley, Rye


Wheat 
Wheat is commonly found in:
  • breads
  • baked goods
  • soups
  • pasta
  • cereals
  • sauces
  • salad dressings
  • roux


Barley 
Barley is commonly found in:
  • malt (malted barley flour, malted milk and milkshakes, malt extract, malt syrup, malt flavoring, malt vinegar)
  • food coloring
  • soups
  • beer
  • Brewer’s Yeast


Rye is commonly found in:

rye
  • rye bread, such as pumpernickel
  • rye beer
  • cereals
Other Grains

Triticale 
Triticale is a newer grain, specifically grown to have a similar quality as wheat, while being tolerant to a variety of growing conditions like rye. It can potentially be found in:
  • breads
  • pasta
  • cereals



oats

Oats can add diversity and offer many nutritional benefits to the gluten-free diet. CDF’s medical experts recommend only oats labeled gluten-free as cross-contact may occur when oats are grown side-by-side with wheat, barley or rye. Patients eating oats from any source may complain of symptoms. This could be due to one or more of several factors, including intolerance to the increase in fiber, food intolerances, contamination with gluten, or, rarely, the development of an immune response to oat protein, similar to that occurring due to gluten.

The decision to include oats in your diet should be made with your physician or dietitian and should include monitoring of your anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibody levels.

Source Celiac.org
Read more 


                                               



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